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  1. Spatial thinking skills are strongly correlated with achievement in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields and emerging research suggests that interventions aimed at building students’...

    Authors: Kristin M. Gagnier and Kelly R. Fisher

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:29

    Content type: Original article

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  2. Characteristics of both teachers and learners influence mathematical learning. For example, when teachers use hand gestures to support instruction, students learn more than others who learn the same concept wi...

    Authors: Mary Aldugom, Kimberly Fenn and Susan Wagner Cook

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:27

    Content type: Original article

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  3. Effort as a concept, whether momentary, sustained, or as a function of different task conditions, is of critical importance to resource theories of attention, fatigue/boredom, workplace motivation, career sele...

    Authors: Phillip L. Ackerman, Corey E. Tatel and Sibley F. Lyndgaard

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:26

    Content type: Original article

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  4. This study investigated the impact of handedness on a common spatial abilities task, the mental rotation task (MRT). The influence of a right-handed world was contrasted with people’s embodied experience with ...

    Authors: You Cheng, Mary Hegarty and Elizabeth R. Chrastil

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:25

    Content type: Original article

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  5. When a fingerprint is located at a crime scene, a human examiner is counted upon to manually compare this print to those stored in a database. Several experiments have now shown that these professional analyst...

    Authors: Jason M. Tangen, Kirsty M. Kent and Rachel A. Searston

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:23

    Content type: Brief report

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  6. Basic cognitive research can help to explain our response to wine, and the myriad factors that affect it. Wine is a complex, culture-laden, multisensory stimulus, and our perception/experience of its propertie...

    Authors: Charles Spence

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:22

    Content type: Review article

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  7. The majority of eyewitness lineup studies are laboratory-based. How well the conclusions of these studies, including the relationship between confidence and accuracy, generalize to real-world police lineups is...

    Authors: Andrew L. Cohen, Jeffrey J. Starns, Caren M. Rotello and Andrea M. Cataldo

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:21

    Content type: Original article

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  8. Spatial reasoning is a critical skill in many everyday tasks and in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines. The current study examined how training on mental rotation (a spatial reasonin...

    Authors: Katherine C. Moen, Melissa R. Beck, Stephanie M. Saltzmann, Tovah M. Cowan, Lauryn M. Burleigh, Leslie G. Butler, Jagannathan Ramanujam, Alex S. Cohen and Steven G. Greening

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:20

    Content type: Original article

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  9. Spatial skills are an important component of success in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. A majority of what we know about spatial skills today is a result of more than 100 years of res...

    Authors: Kinnari Atit, David H. Uttal and Mike Stieff

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:19

    Content type: Review article

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  10. Working memory capacity is known to predict the performance of novices and experts on a variety of tasks found in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). A common feature of STEM tasks is tha...

    Authors: Mike Stieff, Stephanie Werner, Dane DeSutter, Steve Franconeri and Mary Hegarty

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:18

    Content type: Original article

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  11. Considering how spatial thinking connects to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) outcomes, recent studies have evaluated how spatial interventions impact elementary students’ math learning....

    Authors: Heather Burte, Aaron L. Gardony, Allyson Hutton and Holly A. Taylor

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:17

    Content type: Original article

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  12. Social media is an increasingly popular outlet for leisure and social interaction. On many social media platforms, the user experience involves commenting on or responding to user-generated content, such as im...

    Authors: Jordan Zimmerman and Sarah Brown-Schmidt

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:16

    Content type: Original article

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  13. In peer instruction, instructors pose a challenging question to students, students answer the question individually, students work with a partner in the class to discuss their answers, and finally students ans...

    Authors: Jonathan G. Tullis and Robert L. Goldstone

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:15

    Content type: Original article

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  14. Investigating the relationship between the human body and its spatial environment is a critical component in understanding the process of acquiring spatial knowledge. However, few empirical evaluations have lo...

    Authors: Jiayan Zhao, Mark Simpson, Jan Oliver Wallgrün, Pejman Sajjadi and Alexander Klippel

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:14

    Content type: Original article

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  15. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors are faced with the difficult task of learning the layout of complex nuclear facilities while being escorted through the facilities. This study ad...

    Authors: Mallory C. Stites, Laura E. Matzen and Zoe N. Gastelum

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:13

    Content type: Original article

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  16. Anyone who has ever found themselves lost while driving in an unfamiliar neighborhood or forgotten where they parked their car can appreciate the importance of being able to navigate their environment. Navigat...

    Authors: Vanessa Vieites, Shannon M. Pruden and Bethany C. Reeb-Sutherland

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:12

    Content type: Original article

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  17. Social media content is well-remembered, possibly because of its personal relevance and gossipy nature. It is unclear whether the mnemonic advantage of social media extends to a population less familiar with t...

    Authors: Kimberly A. Bourne, Sarah C. Boland, Grace C. Arnold and Jennifer H. Coane

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:11

    Content type: Original article

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  18. Mental rotation (MR) is the ability to transform a mental representation of an object so as to accurately predict how the object would look from a different angle (Sci 171:701–703, 1971), and it is involved in...

    Authors: Scott P. Johnson and David S. Moore

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:10

    Content type: Review article

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  19. Unfamiliar face processing is an ability that varies considerably between individuals. Numerous studies have aimed to identify its underlying determinants using controlled experimental procedures. While such t...

    Authors: Lisa Stacchi, Eva Huguenin-Elie, Roberto Caldara and Meike Ramon

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:8

    Content type: Original article

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  20. Two-hundred one college undergraduates completed four nonverbal interference tasks (Simon, spatial Stroop, vertical Stroop, and flanker) and trait scales of self-control and impulsivity. Regression analyses te...

    Authors: Kenneth R. Paap, Regina Anders-Jefferson, Brandon Zimiga, Lauren Mason and Roman Mikulinsky

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:7

    Content type: Original article

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  21. Causality is inherently linked to decision-making, as causes let us better predict the future and intervene to change it by showing which variables have the capacity to affect others. Recent advances in machin...

    Authors: Min Zheng, Jessecae K. Marsh, Jeffrey V. Nickerson and Samantha Kleinberg

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:6

    Content type: Original Article

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  22. Event-based prospective memory (PM) involves carrying out intentions when specific events occur and is ubiquitous in everyday life. It consists of a prospective component (remembering that something must be done)...

    Authors: Mateja F. Böhm, Ute J. Bayen and Marie Luisa Schaper

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:5

    Content type: Original article

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  23. Extensive research has shown that practice yields highly specific perceptual learning of simple visual properties such as orientation and contrast. Does this same learning characterize more complex perceptual ...

    Authors: Li Z. Sha, Yi Ni Toh, Roger W. Remington and Yuhong V. Jiang

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:4

    Content type: Original article

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  24. In many real-world settings, individuals rarely present another person’s ID, which increases the likelihood that a screener will fail to detect it. Three experiments examined how within-person variability (i.e...

    Authors: Dawn R. Weatherford, William Blake Erickson, Jasmyne Thomas, Mary E. Walker and Barret Schein

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:3

    Content type: Original article

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  25. Making decisions about food is a critical part of everyday life and a principal concern for a number of public health issues. Yet, the mechanisms involved in how people decide what to eat are not yet fully und...

    Authors: Jane Dai, Jeremy Cone and Jeff Moher

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:2

    Content type: Original article

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  26. Cognitive offloading refers to the act of reducing the mental processing requirements of a task through physical actions like writing down information or storing information on a cell phone or computer. Offloa...

    Authors: Alexandra B. Morrison and Lauren L. Richmond

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:1

    Content type: Registered Reports and Replication

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  27. Most science categories are hierarchically organized, with various high-level divisions comprising numerous subtypes. If we suppose that one’s goal is to teach students to classify at the high level, past rese...

    Authors: Robert M. Nosofsky, Colin Slaughter and Mark A. McDaniel

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:48

    Content type: Original article

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  28. Memory retrieval is driven by similarity between a present situation and some prior experience, but not all similarity is created equal. Analogical retrieval, rooted in the similarity between two situations in...

    Authors: Micah B. Goldwater and Anja Jamrozik

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:47

    Content type: Original article

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  29. Retrieval practice, such as filling in blanks or taking quizzes, is firmly established as an effective study strategy. However, the underlying mechanism of how retrieval practice benefits memory is still uncle...

    Authors: Min Kyung Hong, Sean M. Polyn and Lisa K. Fazio

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:46

    Content type: Original article

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  30. Cognitive offloading is the use of physical action to reduce the cognitive demands of a task. Everyday memory relies heavily on this practice; for example, when we write down to-be-remembered information or us...

    Authors: Annika Boldt and Sam J. Gilbert

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:45

    Content type: Original article

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  31. Recent experimental work has shown that hyper-realistic face masks can pass for real faces during live viewing. However, live viewing embeds the perceptual task (mask detection) in a powerful social context th...

    Authors: Jet Gabrielle Sanders, Yoshiyuki Ueda, Sakiko Yoshikawa and Rob Jenkins

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:43

    Content type: Original article

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  32. Users can make judgments about web pages in a glance. Little research has explored what semantic information can be extracted from a web page within a single fixation or what mental representations users have ...

    Authors: Justin W. Owens, Barbara S. Chaparro and Evan M. Palmer

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:44

    Content type: Original article

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  33. Previous research has found that spatial learning while navigating in novel spaces is impaired with extreme restricted peripheral field of view (FOV) (remaining FOV of 4°, but not of 10°) in an indoor environm...

    Authors: Erica M. Barhorst-Cates, Kristina M. Rand and Sarah H. Creem-Regehr

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:41

    Content type: Original article

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  34. The use of neuroscience in the courtroom can be traced back to the early twentieth century. However, the use of neuroscientific evidence in criminal proceedings has increased significantly over the last two de...

    Authors: Darby Aono, Gideon Yaffe and Hedy Kober

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:40

    Content type: Review article

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  35. Hybrid search requires observers to search both through a visual display and through the contents of memory in order to find designated target items. Because professional hybrid searchers such as airport bagga...

    Authors: Jessica Madrid and Michael C. Hout

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:39

    Content type: Original article

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  36. Deception is a prevalent component of human interaction. However, meta-analyses suggest that discriminating between truthful and deceptive statements is a very arduous task and accuracy on these judgments is a...

    Authors: Daniella K. Cash, Rachel E. Dianiska and Sean M. Lane

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:38

    Content type: Original article

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  37. We present a series of experiments on visual search in a highly complex environment, security closed-circuit television (CCTV). Using real surveillance footage from a large city transport hub, we ask viewers t...

    Authors: Mila Mileva and A. Mike Burton

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:37

    Content type: Original article

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  38. A common goal in psychological research is the measurement of subjective impressions, such as first impressions of faces. These impressions are commonly measured using Likert ratings. Although these ratings ar...

    Authors: Nichola Burton, Michael Burton, Dan Rigby, Clare A. M. Sutherland and Gillian Rhodes

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:36

    Content type: Original article

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  39. Testing oneself (i.e., doing retrieval practice) is an effective way to study. We attempted to make learners choose to test themselves more often. In Experiment 1, participants were asked how they wanted to st...

    Authors: Kalif E. Vaughn and Nate Kornell

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:35

    Content type: Original article

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  40. Most experiments in event perception and cognition have focused on events that are only a few minutes in length, and the previous research on popular movies is consistent with this temporal scope. Scenes are g...

    Authors: James E. Cutting and Kacie L. Armstrong

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:34

    Content type: Original article

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  41. Emoji have become a prominent part of interactive digital communication. Here, we ask the questions: does a grammatical system govern the way people use emoji; and how do emoji interact with the grammar of wri...

    Authors: Neil Cohn, Jan Engelen and Joost Schilperoord

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:33

    Content type: Original article

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  42. Road crashes are a leading cause of death worldwide. In many countries, it is common to see spontaneous roadside memorials constructed in response to road fatalities. These memorials are controversial and are ...

    Authors: Vanessa Beanland and Rachael A. Wynne

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:32

    Content type: Registered Reports and Replication

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  43. Visualizing data through graphs can be an effective way to communicate one’s results. A ubiquitous graph and common technique to communicate behavioral data is the bar graph. The bar graph was first invented i...

    Authors: Jessica K. Witt

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:31

    Content type: Brief report

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  44. An error occurred during the publication of a number of articles in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications. Several articles were published in volume 4 with a duplicate citation number.

    Authors:

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:30

    Content type: Correction

    Published on:

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:18

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:20

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:19

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:16

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:17

  45. Criminal associates such as terrorist members are likely to deny knowing members of their network when questioned by police. Eye tracking research suggests that lies about familiar faces can be detected by dis...

    Authors: Ailsa E. Millen and Peter J. B. Hancock

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:23

    Content type: Original article

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  46. True and false intentions (i.e., lies and truths about one’s future actions) is a relatively new research topic, despite the high societal value of being able to predict future criminal behavior (e.g., in the ...

    Authors: Sofia Calderon, Karl Ask, Erik Mac Giolla and Pär Anders Granhag

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:29

    Content type: Original article

    Published on:

  47. In recent years, fraudsters have begun to use readily accessible digital manipulation techniques in order to carry out face morphing attacks. By submitting a morph image (a 50/50 average of two people’s faces)...

    Authors: Robin S. S. Kramer, Michael O. Mireku, Tessa R. Flack and Kay L. Ritchie

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:28

    Content type: Original article

    Published on:

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