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  1. Intersectionality refers to the simultaneous and interacting effects of multiple group categorization on individuals with minoritized status, often leading to being perceived in a manner inconsistent with the ...

    Authors: Shelby Billups, Barbara Thelamour, Paul Thibodeau and Frank H. Durgin
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:100
  2. Radiologists often need only a glance to grasp the essence of complex medical images. Here, we use paradigms and manipulations from perceptual learning and expertise fields to elicit mechanisms and limits of h...

    Authors: Merim Bilalić, Thomas Grottenthaler, Thomas Nägele and Tobias Lindig
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:99
  3. Several studies have investigated the effect of induced mood state on conceptual breadth (breadth and flexibility of thought). Early studies concluded that inducing a positive mood state broadened cognition, w...

    Authors: Andrew Chung, Michael A. Busseri and Karen M. Arnell
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:98
  4. Face masks became prevalent across the globe as an efficient tool to stop the spread of COVID-19. A host of studies already demonstrated that masks lead to changes in facial identification and emotional expres...

    Authors: Erez Freud, Daniela Di Giammarino and Carmel Camilleri
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:97
  5. When selecting fillers to include in a police lineup, one must consider the level of similarity between the suspect and potential fillers. In order to reduce misidentifications, an innocent suspect should not ...

    Authors: Geoffrey L. McKinley and Daniel J. Peterson
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:95
  6. Virtual faces have been found to be rated less human-like and remembered worse than photographic images of humans. What it is in virtual faces that yields reduced memory has so far remained unclear. The curren...

    Authors: Julija Vaitonytė, Maryam Alimardani and Max M. Louwerse
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:94
  7. Cognitive control operates via two distinct mechanisms, proactive and reactive control. These control states are engaged differentially, depending on a number of within-subject factors, but also between-group ...

    Authors: Reem Alzahabi, Erika Hussey and Nathan Ward
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:93
  8. Matching the identity of unfamiliar faces is important in applied identity verification tasks, for example when verifying photo ID at border crossings, in secure access areas, or when issuing identity credenti...

    Authors: Anita Trinh, James D. Dunn and David White
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:92
  9. Although putting on a mask over our nose and mouth is a simple but powerful way to protect ourselves and others during a pandemic, face masks may interfere with how we perceive and recognize one another, and h...

    Authors: Hoo Keat Wong and Alejandro J. Estudillo
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:91
  10. Previous research has shown that even when famous people’s identities cannot be discerned from faces that have been filtered with monochromatic noise, these unidentifiable famous faces still tend to receive hi...

    Authors: Brooke N. Carlaw, Andrew M. Huebert, Katherine L. McNeely-White, Matthew G. Rhodes and Anne M. Cleary
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:90
  11. Face masks affect the transmission of speech and obscure facial cues. Here, we examine how this reduction in acoustic and facial information affects a listener’s understanding of speech prosody. English senten...

    Authors: Chloe Sinagra and Seth Wiener
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:89
  12. The objective was to document the influence of face mask use by other people on communication experiences, participation in activities, and quality of life. Australian adults (n = 665) completed an online survey;...

    Authors: Karyn L. Galvin, Dani Tomlin, Lynette Joubert and Lauren Story
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:88
  13. Misinformation has been a pressing issue since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, threatening our ability to effectively act on the crisis. Nevertheless, little is known about the actual effects of fake n...

    Authors: Constance de Saint Laurent, Gillian Murphy, Karen Hegarty and Ciara M. Greene
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:87
  14. Educational opportunities occur through naturalistic everyday life experiences (e.g., reading a newspaper, listening to a podcast, or visiting a museum). Research primarily examines learning under controlled c...

    Authors: Lucy M. Cronin-Golomb and Patricia J. Bauer
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:86
  15. Fake news can impair memory leading to societal controversies such as COVID-19 vaccine efficacy. The pernicious influence of fake news is clear when ineffective corrections leave memories outdated. A key theor...

    Authors: Paige L. Kemp, Timothy R. Alexander and Christopher N. Wahlheim
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:85
  16. The widespread use of face masks in the era of the Covid-19 pandemic has promoted research on their effect on the perception and recognition of faces. There is growing evidence that masks hinder the recognitio...

    Authors: Tzvi Ganel and Melvyn A. Goodale
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:84
  17. Face masks are now worn frequently to reduce the spreading of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Their health benefits are undisputable, but covering the lower half of one's face also makes it harder for others to recogniz...

    Authors: Mike Rinck, Maximilian A. Primbs, Iris A. M. Verpaalen and Gijsbert Bijlstra
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:83
  18. Consumers are exposed to large amounts of advertising every day. One way to avoid being manipulated is to monitor the sources of persuasive messages. In the present study it was tested whether high exposure to...

    Authors: Raoul Bell, Laura Mieth and Axel Buchner
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:82
  19. Face coverings have been key in reducing the spread of COVID-19. At the same time, they have hindered interpersonal communication, particularly for those who rely on speechreading to aid communication. The ava...

    Authors: Eva Gutierrez-Sigut, Veronica M. Lamarche, Katherine Rowley, Emilio Ferreiro Lago, María Jesús Pardo-Guijarro, Ixone Saenz, Berta Frigola, Santiago Frigola, Delfina Aliaga and Laura Goldberg
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:81
  20. Wakeful resting and listening to music are powerful means to modulate memory. How these activities affect memory when directly compared has not been tested so far. In two experiments, participants encoded and ...

    Authors: Markus Martini, Jessica R. Wasmeier, Francesca Talamini, Stefan E. Huber and Pierre Sachse
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:80
  21. Facial first impressions are known to influence how we behave towards others. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we often view incomplete faces due to the commonplace wearing of face masks. Previous researc...

    Authors: Robin S. S. Kramer and Alex L. Jones
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:79
  22. Positive symptoms of schizophrenia are associated with significant difficulties in daily functioning, and these difficulties have been associated with impaired executive functions (EEFF). However, specific cog...

    Authors: Pamela Ruiz-Castañeda, Encarnación Santiago Molina, Haney Aguirre Loaiza and María Teresa Daza González
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:78
  23. Typing has become a pervasive mode of language production worldwide, with keyboards fully integrated in a large part of many daily activities. The bulk of the literature on typing expertise concerns highly tra...

    Authors: Svetlana Pinet, Christelle Zielinski, F.-Xavier Alario and Marieke Longcamp
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:77

    The Correction to this article has been published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:96

  24. Research on the impact of auditory information on visual anticipation in tennis suggests that the intensity of racket-ball-contact sounds systematically biases estimates of the ball’s speed, thereby influencin...

    Authors: Rouwen Cañal-Bruland, Hauke S. Meyerhoff and Florian Müller
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:76
  25. Mask-wearing during the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a growing interest in the functional impact of masks on speech and communication. Prior work has shown that masks dampen sound, impede visual communicatio...

    Authors: Sarah E. Gutz, Hannah P. Rowe, Victoria E. Tilton-Bolowsky and Jordan R. Green
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:73
  26. When two people read the same story, they might both end up liking it very much. However, this does not necessarily mean that their reasons for liking it were identical. We therefore ask what factors contribut...

    Authors: Marloes Mak, Myrthe Faber and Roel M. Willems
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:72
  27. The tendency to devaluate delayed rewards, a phenomenon referred to as ‘discounting behaviour’, has been studied by wide-ranging research examining individuals choosing between sooner but smaller or later but ...

    Authors: Diana Schwenke, Peggy Wehner and Stefan Scherbaum
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:71
  28. Evidence-based algorithms can improve both lay and professional judgements and decisions, yet they remain underutilised. Research on advice taking established that humans tend to discount advice—especially whe...

    Authors: Bence Pálfi, Kavleen Arora and Olga Kostopoulou
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:70
  29. Task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) are frequent distractions from our everyday tasks, which can reduce productivity and safety during task performance. This necessitates the examination of factors that modulate TU...

    Authors: Chelsie M. Hart, Caitlin Mills, Raela F. Thiemann, Jessica R. Andrews-Hanna, Lianne Tomfohr-Madsen and Julia W. Y. Kam
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:69
  30. Health misinformation is a problem on social media, and more understanding is needed about how users cognitively process it. In this study, participants’ accuracy in determining whether 60 health claims were t...

    Authors: Mark Lowry, Neha Trivedi, Patrick Boyd, Anne Julian, Melissa Treviño, Yuki Lama, Kathryn Heley and Frank Perna
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:68
  31. The drift diffusion model (DDM) is a widely applied computational model of decision making that allows differentiation between latent cognitive and residual processes. One main assumption of the DDM that has u...

    Authors: Joshua Sandry and Timothy J. Ricker
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:66
  32. Sequential lineups are one of the most commonly used procedures in police departments across the USA. Although this procedure has been the target of much experimental research, there has been comparatively lit...

    Authors: David Kellen and Ryan M. McAdoo
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:65
  33. Use of face masks is one of the measures adopted by the general community to stop the transmission of disease during this ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. This wide use of face masks has indeed been shown to disrupt...

    Authors: Ricky V. Tso, Celine O. Chui and Janet H. Hsiao
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:64
  34. Surgical face masks reduce the spread of airborne pathogens but also disturb the flow of information between individuals. The risk of getting seriously ill after infection with SARS-COV-2 during the present CO...

    Authors: Lea Henke, Maja Guseva, Katja Wagemans, Doris Pischedda, John-Dylan Haynes, Georg Jahn and Silke Anders
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:63
  35. Past studies of emotion and mood on memory have mostly focused on the learning of emotional material in the laboratory or on the consequences of a punctate catastrophic event. However, the influence of a long-...

    Authors: Chong Zhao, Keisuke Fukuda, Sohee Park and Geoffrey F. Woodman
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:62
  36. Nowadays individuals can readily set reminders to offload intentions onto external resources, such as smartphone alerts, rather than using internal memory. Individuals tend to be biased, setting more reminders...

    Authors: Lea Fröscher, Ann-Kathrin Friedrich, Max Berentelg, Curtis Widmer, Sam J. Gilbert and Frank Papenmeier
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:61
  37. Forensic science practitioners compare visual evidence samples (e.g. fingerprints) and decide if they originate from the same person or different people (i.e. fingerprint ‘matching’). These tasks are perceptua...

    Authors: Bethany Growns, Alice Towler, James D. Dunn, Jessica M. Salerno, N. J. Schweitzer and Itiel E. Dror
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:60
  38. While face masks provide necessary protection against disease spread, they occlude the lower face parts (chin, mouth, nose) and consequently impair the ability to accurately perceive facial emotions. Here we e...

    Authors: Sarah D. McCrackin, Sabrina Provencher, Ethan Mendell and Jelena Ristic
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:59

    The Correction to this article has been published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:75

  39. Representing the base-10 structure of numbers is a challenging cognitive ability, unique to humans, but it is yet unknown how precisely this is done. Here, we examined whether and how literate adults represent...

    Authors: Dror Dotan and Nadin Brutmann
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:58

    The Correction to this article has been published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:74

  40. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, face coverings were introduced as a safety measure in certain environments in England and some research suggests that they can affect emotion recognition. Factors such as ...

    Authors: Holly Cooper, Amrit Brar, Hazel Beyaztas, Ben J. Jennings and Rachel J. Bennetts
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:57
  41. Visual search—looking for targets among distractors—underlies many critical professions (e.g., radiology, aviation security) that demand optimal performance. As such, it is important to identify, understand, a...

    Authors: Justin N. Grady, Patrick H. Cox, Samoni Nag and Stephen R. Mitroff
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:56
  42. There is an increasing need in eyewitness identification research to identify factors that not only influence identification accuracy but may also impact the confidence–accuracy (CA) relationship. One such var...

    Authors: Sara D. Davis and Daniel J. Peterson
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:55
  43. Facial expressions provide key information for successful social interactions. Recent research finds that accurate perception of emotion expressions decreases when faces are presented with face masks. What is ...

    Authors: Riley H. Swain, Aminda J. O’Hare, Kamila Brandley and A. Tye Gardner
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:54
  44. Face masks occlude parts of the face which hinders social communication and emotion recognition. Since sign language users are known to process facial information not only perceptually but also linguistically,...

    Authors: Wee Kiat Lau, Jana Chalupny, Klaudia Grote and Anke Huckauf
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:53
  45. Many studies have shown that using a computer-aided detection (CAD) system does not significantly improve diagnostic accuracy in radiology, possibly because radiologists fail to interpret the CAD results prope...

    Authors: Fallon Branch, K. Matthew Williams, Isabella Noel Santana and Jay Hegdé
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2022 7:52

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