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  1. Road crashes are a leading cause of death worldwide. In many countries, it is common to see spontaneous roadside memorials constructed in response to road fatalities. These memorials are controversial and are ...

    Authors: Vanessa Beanland and Rachael A. Wynne
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:32
  2. Visualizing data through graphs can be an effective way to communicate one’s results. A ubiquitous graph and common technique to communicate behavioral data is the bar graph. The bar graph was first invented i...

    Authors: Jessica K. Witt
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:31
  3. An error occurred during the publication of a number of articles in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications. Several articles were published in volume 4 with a duplicate citation number.

    Authors:
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:30

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:18

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:20

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:19

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:16

    The original article was published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:17

  4. Criminal associates such as terrorist members are likely to deny knowing members of their network when questioned by police. Eye tracking research suggests that lies about familiar faces can be detected by dis...

    Authors: Ailsa E. Millen and Peter J. B. Hancock
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:23
  5. True and false intentions (i.e., lies and truths about one’s future actions) is a relatively new research topic, despite the high societal value of being able to predict future criminal behavior (e.g., in the ...

    Authors: Sofia Calderon, Karl Ask, Erik Mac Giolla and Pär Anders Granhag
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:29
  6. In recent years, fraudsters have begun to use readily accessible digital manipulation techniques in order to carry out face morphing attacks. By submitting a morph image (a 50/50 average of two people’s faces)...

    Authors: Robin S. S. Kramer, Michael O. Mireku, Tessa R. Flack and Kay L. Ritchie
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:28
  7. The role of image colour in face identification has received little attention in research despite the importance of identifying people from photographs in identity documents (IDs). Here, in two experiments, we...

    Authors: Anna K. Bobak, Viktoria R. Mileva and Peter J. B. Hancock
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:27
  8. In general, people are poor at detecting deception. Older adults are even worse than young adults at detecting deceit, which might make them uniquely vulnerable to certain types of financial fraud. One reason ...

    Authors: Jennifer Tehan Stanley and Britney A. Webster
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:26
  9. Intentional forgetting refers to the attempt to marshal top-down control to purposefully forget, and has been demonstrated in the laboratory using directed forgetting paradigms. Here, we asked whether the mech...

    Authors: Ashleigh M. Maxcey, Bernadette Dezso, Emma Megla and Ashton Schneider
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:25
  10. In two studies we investigated whether removing opportunities to calculate could improve students’ subsequent ability to solve similar word problems. Students were first asked to write explanations for three w...

    Authors: Karen B. Givvin, Veronika Moroz, William Loftus and James W. Stigler
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:24
  11. A growing body of research is beginning to understand how people comprehend sequential visual narratives. However, previous work has used materials that primarily rely on visual information (i.e., they contain...

    Authors: Ryan D. Kopatich, Daniel P. Feller, Christopher A. Kurby and Joseph P. Magliano
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:22
  12. Interpretation of volumetric medical images represents a rapidly growing proportion of the workload in radiology. However, relatively little is known about the strategies that best guide search behavior when l...

    Authors: Lauren H. Williams and Trafton Drew
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:21
  13. New automobiles provide a variety of features that allow motorists to perform a plethora of secondary tasks unrelated to the primary task of driving. Despite their ubiquity, surprisingly little is known about ...

    Authors: David L. Strayer, Joel M. Cooper, Rachel M. Goethe, Madeleine M. McCarty, Douglas J. Getty and Francesco Biondi
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:18

    The Correction to this article has been published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:30

  14. Researchers have argued that simultaneous lineups should follow the principle of propitious heterogeneity, based on the idea that if the fillers are too similar to the perpetrator even an eyewitness with a goo...

    Authors: Curt A. Carlson, Alyssa R. Jones, Jane E. Whittington, Robert F. Lockamyeir, Maria A. Carlson and Alex R. Wooten
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:20

    The Correction to this article has been published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:30

  15. While the coordination of oculomotor and manual behavior is essential for driving a car, surprisingly little is known about this interaction, especially in situations requiring a quick steering reaction. In th...

    Authors: Norbert Schneider and Lynn Huestegge
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:19

    The Correction to this article has been published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:30

  16. Research examining the relation between spatial skills and the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields has focused on small-scale spatial skills, even though some STEM disciplines—partic...

    Authors: Alina Nazareth, Nora S. Newcombe, Thomas F. Shipley, Mia Velazquez and Steven M. Weisberg
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:17

    The Correction to this article has been published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:30

  17. A significant problem in eyewitness identification occurs when witnesses view a suspect in one venue such as a mugshot and then later in a lineup where the suspect is the only previously viewed person. Prior r...

    Authors: Wenbo Lin, Michael J. Strube and Henry L. Roediger III
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:16

    The Correction to this article has been published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:30

  18. Overconfidence in one’s driving ability can lead to risky decision-making and may therefore increase the accident risk. When educating people about the risks of their driving behavior, it is all too easy for i...

    Authors: Daniel O. A. Gunnell, Melina A. Kunar, Danielle G. Norman and Derrick G. Watson
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:15
  19. To successfully interact with software agents, people must call upon basic concepts about goals and intentionality and strategically deploy these concepts in a range of circumstances where specific entailments...

    Authors: Christopher Brett Jaeger, Alicia M. Hymel, Daniel T. Levin, Gautam Biswas, Natalie Paul and John Kinnebrew
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:14
  20. Inattentional blindness methods allow for an unobtrusive measure of the spatial distribution of attention; because subjects do not expect the critical object, they have no reason to devote attention to task-ir...

    Authors: Katherine Wood and Daniel J. Simons
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:13
  21. The comparison of fingerprints by expert latent print examiners generally involves repeating a process in which the examiner selects a small area of distinctive features in one print (a target group), and sear...

    Authors: R. Austin Hicklin, Bradford T. Ulery, Thomas A. Busey, Maria Antonia Roberts and JoAnn Buscaglia
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:12
  22. While the Concealed Information Test (CIT) can determine whether examinees recognize critical details, it does not clarify the origin of the memory. Hence, when unknowledgeable suspects are contaminated with c...

    Authors: Linda Marjoleine Geven, Gershon Ben-Shakhar, Merel Kindt and Bruno Verschuere
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:11
  23. What can theories regarding memory-related gaze preference contribute to the field of deception detection? While abundant research has examined the ability to detect concealed information through physiological...

    Authors: Tal Nahari, Oryah Lancry-Dayan, Gershon Ben-Shakhar and Yoni Pertzov
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:10
  24. Why do people change their strategies for solving problems? In this research, we tested whether negative feedback and the context in which learners encounter a strategy influence their likelihood of adopting t...

    Authors: Sarah A. Brown, David Menendez and Martha W. Alibali
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:9
  25. Inspecting digital imaging for primary diagnosis introduces perceptual and cognitive demands for physicians tasked with interpreting visual medical information and arriving at appropriate diagnoses and treatme...

    Authors: Tad T. Brunyé, Trafton Drew, Donald L. Weaver and Joann G. Elmore
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:7
  26. Home loans are the largest financial transaction consumers typically enter and the consequences from entering overpriced or unaffordable home loans can devastate individuals and entire communities. This articl...

    Authors: Jessica M. Choplin and Debra Pogrund Stark
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:6
  27. Navigation systems are ubiquitous tools to assist wayfinders of the mobile information society with various navigational tasks. Whenever such systems assist with self-localization and path planning, they reduc...

    Authors: Annina Brügger, Kai-Florian Richter and Sara Irina Fabrikant
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:5
  28. In five experiments, we examined the conditions under which participants remembered true and false information given as feedback. Participants answered general information questions, expressed their confidence...

    Authors: Janet Metcalfe and Teal S. Eich
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:4
  29. The comprehension of dynamic naturalistic events poses at least two challenges to the cognitive system: filtering relevant information with attention and dealing with information that was missing or missed. Wi...

    Authors: Frank Papenmeier, Alisa Brockhoff and Markus Huff
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:3
  30. Illusory causation refers to a consistent error in human learning in which the learner develops a false belief that two unrelated events are causally associated. Laboratory studies usually demonstrate illusory...

    Authors: Julie Y. L. Chow, Ben Colagiuri and Evan J. Livesey
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:1
  31. Previous research has demonstrated reliable fluctuations in attentional processes during the course of the day. Everyday life experience sampling, during which participants respond to “probes” delivered at ran...

    Authors: Gabriel King Smith, Caitlin Mills, Alexandra Paxton and Kalina Christoff
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:54
  32. The ability to predict what is going to happen in the near future is integral for daily functioning. Previous research suggests that predictability varies over time, with increases in prediction error at those...

    Authors: Michelle L. Eisenberg, Jeffrey M. Zacks and Shaney Flores
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:53
  33. Explanations from neuroscience are threatening to replace those from psychology in the eyes and hands of journalists, university administrators, granting agencies, and research students. If replacement happens...

    Authors: Jonathan Baron
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:52
  34. Referential success is crucial for collaborative task-solving in shared environments. In face-to-face interactions, humans, therefore, exploit speech, gesture, and gaze to identify a specific object. We invest...

    Authors: Nikolina Mitev, Patrick Renner, Thies Pfeiffer and Maria Staudte
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:51
  35. Although phenomena such as change blindness and inattentional blindness are robust, it is not entirely clear how these failures of visual awareness are related to failures to attend to visual information, to r...

    Authors: Daniel T. Levin, Adriane E. Seiffert, Sun-Joo Cho and Kelly E. Carter
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:49
  36. Spatial reasoning skill has consistently been found to be malleable. However, there is little research to date on embedding spatial training within learning frameworks. This study evaluated the effects of a cl...

    Authors: Tom Lowrie, Tracy Logan, Danielle Harris and Mary Hegarty
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:50
  37. The visual environment contains predictable information - “statistical regularities” - that can be used to aid perception and attentional allocation. Here we investigate the role of statistical learning in fac...

    Authors: Li Z. Sha, Roger W. Remington and Yuhong V. Jiang
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:48
  38. Video job interviews have become a common hiring practice, allowing employers to save money and recruit from a wider applicant pool. But differences in job candidates’ internet connections mean that some inter...

    Authors: Joshua L. Fiechter, Caitlan Fealing, Rachel Gerrard and Nate Kornell
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:47
  39. Schema acquisition processes comprise an essential source of cognitive demands in learning situations. To shed light on related mechanisms and influencing factors, this study applied a continuous multi-measure...

    Authors: Maria Wirzberger, Robert Herms, Shirin Esmaeili Bijarsari, Maximilian Eibl and Günter Daniel Rey
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:46
  40. Attention in the “real world” fluctuates over time, but these fluctuations are hard to examine using a timed trial-based experimental paradigm. Here we use film to study attention. To achieve short-term engage...

    Authors: Stephen J. Hinde, Tim J. Smith and Iain D. Gilchrist
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:45
  41. Previous work has found that people are drawn to explanations of psychological phenomena when these explanations contain neuroscience information, even when that information is irrelevant. This preference may ...

    Authors: Deena Skolnick Weisberg, Emily J. Hopkins and Jordan C. V. Taylor
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:44
  42. The present study examined the impact that the environment has on the ability to remain attentive and retain information. Participants listened to an audiobook in either a controlled lab setting or in an uncon...

    Authors: Trish L. Varao-Sousa, Daniel Smilek and Alan Kingstone
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:42
  43. Police departments often use verbal confidence measures (highly confident, somewhat confident) with a small number of values, whereas psychologists measuring the confidence–accuracy relationship typically use ...

    Authors: Eylul Tekin, Wenbo Lin and Henry L. Roediger III
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:41
  44. Many medical professions require practitioners to perform visual categorizations in domains such as radiology, dermatology, and neurology. However, acquiring visual expertise is tedious and time-consuming and ...

    Authors: Brett D. Roads, Buyun Xu, June K. Robinson and James W. Tanaka
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:38
  45. Searching for unfamiliar faces in crowds is an important task in modern society. In surveillance and security settings, it is sometimes critical to locate a target individual quickly and accurately. In this st...

    Authors: James D. Dunn, Richard I. Kemp and David White
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:37
  46. People learn environments through direct experience with the environment and/or through map study. Further, the different perspectives taken while learning an environment influence the knowledge acquired. Afte...

    Authors: Ruizhi Dai, Ayanna K. Thomas and Holly A. Taylor
    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2018 3:36

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