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  1. Traditionally, architectural practice has been dominated by the eye/sight. In recent decades, though, architects and designers have increasingly started to consider the other senses, namely sound, touch (inclu...

    Authors: Charles Spence

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:46

    Content type: Review article

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  2. It has widely been accepted that aggregating group-level decisions is superior to individual decisions. As compared to individuals, groups tend to show a decision advantage in their response accuracy. However,...

    Authors: Cheng-Ju Hsieh, Mario Fifić and Cheng-Ta Yang

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:45

    Content type: Original article

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  3. The effect of cognitive load on social attention was examined across three experiments in a live pedestrian passing scenario (Experiments 1 and 2) and with the same scenario presented as a video (Experiment 3)...

    Authors: Laura J. Bianchi, Alan Kingstone and Evan F. Risko

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:44

    Content type: Original article

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  4. Prior research has revealed positive effects of spatial activity participation (e.g., playing with blocks, sports) on current and future spatial skills. However, research has not examined the degree to which s...

    Authors: Emily Grossnickle Peterson, Adam B. Weinberger, David H. Uttal, Bob Kolvoord and Adam E. Green

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:43

    Content type: Original article

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  5. Navigating an unfamiliar city almost certainly brings out uncertainty about getting from place to place. This uncertainty, in turn, triggers information gathering. While navigational uncertainty is common, lit...

    Authors: Ashlynn M. Keller, Holly A. Taylor and Tad T. Brunyé

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:42

    Content type: Review article

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  6. Misinformation often continues to influence inferential reasoning after clear and credible corrections are provided; this effect is known as the continued influence effect. It has been theorized that this effe...

    Authors: Ullrich K. H. Ecker, Stephan Lewandowsky and Matthew Chadwick

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:41

    Content type: Original article

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  7. Central banks incorporate various security features in their banknotes to enable themselves, the general public, retailers and professional cash handlers to detect counterfeits. In two field experiments, we te...

    Authors: Frank van der Horst, Joshua Snell and Jan Theeuwes

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:40

    Content type: Original article

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  8. In criminal investigations, uncooperative witnesses might deny knowing a perpetrator, the location of a murder scene or knowledge of a weapon. We sought to identify markers of recognition in eye fixations and ...

    Authors: Ailsa E. Millen, Lorraine Hope and Anne P. Hillstrom

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:38

    Content type: Original article

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  9. Sensory substitution techniques are perceptual and cognitive phenomena used to represent one sensory form with an alternative. Current applications of sensory substitution techniques are typically focused on t...

    Authors: Tayfun Lloyd-Esenkaya, Vanessa Lloyd-Esenkaya, Eamonn O’Neill and Michael J. Proulx

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:37

    Content type: Review article

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  10. Most everyday activities involve delayed intentions referring to different event structures and timelines. Yet, past research has mostly considered prospective memory (PM) as a dual-task phenomenon in which th...

    Authors: Veit Kubik, Fabio Del Missier and Timo Mäntylä

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:36

    Content type: Original article

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  11. Debate regarding the best way to test and measure eyewitness memory has dominated the eyewitness literature for more than 30 years. We argue that resolution of this debate requires the development and applicat...

    Authors: Matthew Kaesler, John C. Dunn, Keith Ransom and Carolyn Semmler

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:35

    Content type: Original article

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  12. Teachers sometimes believe in the efficacy of instructional practices that have little empirical support. These beliefs have proven difficult to efface despite strong challenges to their evidentiary basis. Tea...

    Authors: Kit S. Double, Julie Y. L. Chow, Evan J. Livesey and Therese N. Hopfenbeck

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:34

    Content type: Original article

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  13. The reaction time-based Concealed Information Test (RT-CIT) is a memory paradigm used to detect crime-related knowledge. However, this would also imply that the RT-CIT would be vulnerable to factors that are k...

    Authors: Ann Hsu, Yu-Hui Lo, Shi-Chiang Ke, Lin Lin and Philip Tseng

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:33

    Content type: Original article

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  14. When radiologists search for a specific target (e.g., lung cancer), they are also asked to report any other clinically significant “incidental findings” (e.g., pneumonia). These incidental findings are missed ...

    Authors: Makaela S. Nartker, Abla Alaoui-Soce and Jeremy M. Wolfe

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:32

    Content type: Original article

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  15. Mental rotation ability is associated with successful advances in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education and occupations. Meta-analyses have shown consistent sex disparities in ment...

    Authors: Daniela Alvarez-Vargas, Carla Abad and Shannon M. Pruden

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:31

    Content type: Original article

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  16. Experts in medical image perception are able to detect abnormalities rapidly from medical images. This ability is likely due to enhanced pattern recognition on a global scale. However, the bulk of research in ...

    Authors: A. J. Carrigan, P. Stoodley, F. Fernandez and M. W. Wiggins

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:30

    Content type: Original article

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  17. Spatial thinking skills are strongly correlated with achievement in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields and emerging research suggests that interventions aimed at building students’...

    Authors: Kristin M. Gagnier and Kelly R. Fisher

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:29

    Content type: Original article

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  18. Characteristics of both teachers and learners influence mathematical learning. For example, when teachers use hand gestures to support instruction, students learn more than others who learn the same concept wi...

    Authors: Mary Aldugom, Kimberly Fenn and Susan Wagner Cook

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:27

    Content type: Original article

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  19. Effort as a concept, whether momentary, sustained, or as a function of different task conditions, is of critical importance to resource theories of attention, fatigue/boredom, workplace motivation, career sele...

    Authors: Phillip L. Ackerman, Corey E. Tatel and Sibley F. Lyndgaard

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:26

    Content type: Original article

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  20. This study investigated the impact of handedness on a common spatial abilities task, the mental rotation task (MRT). The influence of a right-handed world was contrasted with people’s embodied experience with ...

    Authors: You Cheng, Mary Hegarty and Elizabeth R. Chrastil

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:25

    Content type: Original article

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  21. When a fingerprint is located at a crime scene, a human examiner is counted upon to manually compare this print to those stored in a database. Several experiments have now shown that these professional analyst...

    Authors: Jason M. Tangen, Kirsty M. Kent and Rachel A. Searston

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:23

    Content type: Brief report

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  22. Basic cognitive research can help to explain our response to wine, and the myriad factors that affect it. Wine is a complex, culture-laden, multisensory stimulus, and our perception/experience of its propertie...

    Authors: Charles Spence

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:22

    Content type: Review article

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  23. The majority of eyewitness lineup studies are laboratory-based. How well the conclusions of these studies, including the relationship between confidence and accuracy, generalize to real-world police lineups is...

    Authors: Andrew L. Cohen, Jeffrey J. Starns, Caren M. Rotello and Andrea M. Cataldo

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:21

    Content type: Original article

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  24. Spatial reasoning is a critical skill in many everyday tasks and in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines. The current study examined how training on mental rotation (a spatial reasonin...

    Authors: Katherine C. Moen, Melissa R. Beck, Stephanie M. Saltzmann, Tovah M. Cowan, Lauryn M. Burleigh, Leslie G. Butler, Jagannathan Ramanujam, Alex S. Cohen and Steven G. Greening

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:20

    Content type: Original article

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  25. Spatial skills are an important component of success in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. A majority of what we know about spatial skills today is a result of more than 100 years of res...

    Authors: Kinnari Atit, David H. Uttal and Mike Stieff

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:19

    Content type: Review article

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  26. Working memory capacity is known to predict the performance of novices and experts on a variety of tasks found in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). A common feature of STEM tasks is tha...

    Authors: Mike Stieff, Stephanie Werner, Dane DeSutter, Steve Franconeri and Mary Hegarty

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:18

    Content type: Original article

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  27. Considering how spatial thinking connects to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) outcomes, recent studies have evaluated how spatial interventions impact elementary students’ math learning....

    Authors: Heather Burte, Aaron L. Gardony, Allyson Hutton and Holly A. Taylor

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:17

    Content type: Original article

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  28. Social media is an increasingly popular outlet for leisure and social interaction. On many social media platforms, the user experience involves commenting on or responding to user-generated content, such as im...

    Authors: Jordan Zimmerman and Sarah Brown-Schmidt

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:16

    Content type: Original article

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  29. In peer instruction, instructors pose a challenging question to students, students answer the question individually, students work with a partner in the class to discuss their answers, and finally students ans...

    Authors: Jonathan G. Tullis and Robert L. Goldstone

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:15

    Content type: Original article

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  30. Investigating the relationship between the human body and its spatial environment is a critical component in understanding the process of acquiring spatial knowledge. However, few empirical evaluations have lo...

    Authors: Jiayan Zhao, Mark Simpson, Jan Oliver Wallgrün, Pejman Sajjadi and Alexander Klippel

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:14

    Content type: Original article

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  31. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors are faced with the difficult task of learning the layout of complex nuclear facilities while being escorted through the facilities. This study ad...

    Authors: Mallory C. Stites, Laura E. Matzen and Zoe N. Gastelum

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:13

    Content type: Original article

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  32. Anyone who has ever found themselves lost while driving in an unfamiliar neighborhood or forgotten where they parked their car can appreciate the importance of being able to navigate their environment. Navigat...

    Authors: Vanessa Vieites, Shannon M. Pruden and Bethany C. Reeb-Sutherland

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:12

    Content type: Original article

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  33. Social media content is well-remembered, possibly because of its personal relevance and gossipy nature. It is unclear whether the mnemonic advantage of social media extends to a population less familiar with t...

    Authors: Kimberly A. Bourne, Sarah C. Boland, Grace C. Arnold and Jennifer H. Coane

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:11

    Content type: Original article

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  34. Mental rotation (MR) is the ability to transform a mental representation of an object so as to accurately predict how the object would look from a different angle (Sci 171:701–703, 1971), and it is involved in...

    Authors: Scott P. Johnson and David S. Moore

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:10

    Content type: Review article

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  35. Unfamiliar face processing is an ability that varies considerably between individuals. Numerous studies have aimed to identify its underlying determinants using controlled experimental procedures. While such t...

    Authors: Lisa Stacchi, Eva Huguenin-Elie, Roberto Caldara and Meike Ramon

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:8

    Content type: Original article

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  36. Two-hundred one college undergraduates completed four nonverbal interference tasks (Simon, spatial Stroop, vertical Stroop, and flanker) and trait scales of self-control and impulsivity. Regression analyses te...

    Authors: Kenneth R. Paap, Regina Anders-Jefferson, Brandon Zimiga, Lauren Mason and Roman Mikulinsky

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:7

    Content type: Original article

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  37. Causality is inherently linked to decision-making, as causes let us better predict the future and intervene to change it by showing which variables have the capacity to affect others. Recent advances in machin...

    Authors: Min Zheng, Jessecae K. Marsh, Jeffrey V. Nickerson and Samantha Kleinberg

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:6

    Content type: Original Article

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  38. Event-based prospective memory (PM) involves carrying out intentions when specific events occur and is ubiquitous in everyday life. It consists of a prospective component (remembering that something must be done)...

    Authors: Mateja F. Böhm, Ute J. Bayen and Marie Luisa Schaper

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:5

    Content type: Original article

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  39. Extensive research has shown that practice yields highly specific perceptual learning of simple visual properties such as orientation and contrast. Does this same learning characterize more complex perceptual ...

    Authors: Li Z. Sha, Yi Ni Toh, Roger W. Remington and Yuhong V. Jiang

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:4

    Content type: Original article

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  40. In many real-world settings, individuals rarely present another person’s ID, which increases the likelihood that a screener will fail to detect it. Three experiments examined how within-person variability (i.e...

    Authors: Dawn R. Weatherford, William Blake Erickson, Jasmyne Thomas, Mary E. Walker and Barret Schein

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:3

    Content type: Original article

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  41. Making decisions about food is a critical part of everyday life and a principal concern for a number of public health issues. Yet, the mechanisms involved in how people decide what to eat are not yet fully und...

    Authors: Jane Dai, Jeremy Cone and Jeff Moher

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:2

    Content type: Original article

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  42. Cognitive offloading refers to the act of reducing the mental processing requirements of a task through physical actions like writing down information or storing information on a cell phone or computer. Offloa...

    Authors: Alexandra B. Morrison and Lauren L. Richmond

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2020 5:1

    Content type: Registered Reports and Replication

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  43. Most science categories are hierarchically organized, with various high-level divisions comprising numerous subtypes. If we suppose that one’s goal is to teach students to classify at the high level, past rese...

    Authors: Robert M. Nosofsky, Colin Slaughter and Mark A. McDaniel

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:48

    Content type: Original article

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  44. Memory retrieval is driven by similarity between a present situation and some prior experience, but not all similarity is created equal. Analogical retrieval, rooted in the similarity between two situations in...

    Authors: Micah B. Goldwater and Anja Jamrozik

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:47

    Content type: Original article

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  45. Retrieval practice, such as filling in blanks or taking quizzes, is firmly established as an effective study strategy. However, the underlying mechanism of how retrieval practice benefits memory is still uncle...

    Authors: Min Kyung Hong, Sean M. Polyn and Lisa K. Fazio

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:46

    Content type: Original article

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  46. Cognitive offloading is the use of physical action to reduce the cognitive demands of a task. Everyday memory relies heavily on this practice; for example, when we write down to-be-remembered information or us...

    Authors: Annika Boldt and Sam J. Gilbert

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:45

    Content type: Original article

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  47. Recent experimental work has shown that hyper-realistic face masks can pass for real faces during live viewing. However, live viewing embeds the perceptual task (mask detection) in a powerful social context th...

    Authors: Jet Gabrielle Sanders, Yoshiyuki Ueda, Sakiko Yoshikawa and Rob Jenkins

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2019 4:43

    Content type: Original article

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