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  1. Original article

    The impact of fillers on lineup performance

    Filler siphoning theory posits that the presence of fillers (known innocents) in a lineup protects an innocent suspect from being chosen by siphoning choices away from that innocent suspect. This mechanism has...

    Stacy A. Wetmore, Ryan M. McAdoo, Scott D. Gronlund and Jeffrey S. Neuschatz

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:48

    Published on: 22 November 2017

  2. Original article

    The effect of testing can increase or decrease misinformation susceptibility depending on the retention interval

    Research has consistently demonstrated that testing prior to the presentation of misleading post-event information, within the context of a standard eyewitness misinformation paradigm, results in an increase i...

    Ayanna K. Thomas, Leamarie T. Gordon, Paul M. Cernasov and John B. Bulevich

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:45

    Published on: 22 November 2017

  3. Original article

    What is the role of the film viewer? The effects of narrative comprehension and viewing task on gaze control in film

    Film is ubiquitous, but the processes that guide viewers’ attention while viewing film narratives are poorly understood. In fact, many film theorists and practitioners disagree on whether the film stimulus (bo...

    John P. Hutson, Tim J. Smith, Joseph P. Magliano and Lester C. Loschky

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:46

    Published on: 22 November 2017

  4. Original article

    Eye movement feedback fails to improve visual search performance

    Many real-world searches (e.g., radiology and baggage screening) have rare targets. When targets are rare, observers perform rapid, incomplete searches, leading to higher miss rates. To improve search for rare...

    Chad Peltier and Mark W. Becker

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:47

    Published on: 22 November 2017

  5. Original article

    Simple eye-movement feedback during visual search is not helpful

    Searching for targets in the visual world, or visual search, is something we all do every day. We frequently make ‘false-negative’ errors, wherein we erroneously conclude a target was absent when one was, in f...

    Trafton Drew and Lauren H. Williams

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:44

    Published on: 22 November 2017

  6. Original article

    Teachers’ gestures and students’ learning: sometimes “hands off” is better

    During mathematics instruction, teachers often make links between different representations of mathematical information, and they sometimes use gestures to refer to the representations that they link. In this ...

    Amelia Yeo, Iasmine Ledesma, Mitchell J. Nathan, Martha W. Alibali and R. Breckinridge Church

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:41

    Published on: 25 October 2017

  7. Original article

    Hyper-realistic face masks: a new challenge in person identification

    We often identify people using face images. This is true in occupational settings such as passport control as well as in everyday social environments. Mapping between images and identities assumes that facial ...

    Jet Gabrielle Sanders, Yoshiyuki Ueda, Kazusa Minemoto, Eilidh Noyes, Sakiko Yoshikawa and Rob Jenkins

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:43

    Published on: 25 October 2017

  8. Original article

    Prequestions do not enhance the benefits of retrieval in a STEM classroom

    Answering questions before a learning episode—“prequestions”—can enhance memory for that information. A number of studies have explored this effect in the laboratory; however, few studies have examined preques...

    Jason Geller, Shana K. Carpenter, Monica H. Lamm, Shuhebur Rahman, Patrick I. Armstrong and Clark R. Coffman

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:42

    Published on: 25 October 2017

  9. Original article

    Inattentional blindness for a gun during a simulated police vehicle stop

    People often fail to notice unexpected objects and events when they are focusing attention on something else. Most studies of this “inattentional blindness” use unexpected objects that are irrelevant to the pr...

    Daniel J. Simons and Michael D. Schlosser

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:37

    Published on: 20 September 2017

  10. Original article

    How did I miss that? Developing mixed hybrid visual search as a ‘model system’ for incidental finding errors in radiology

    In a real world search, it can be important to keep ‘an eye out’ for items of interest that are not the primary subject of the search. For instance, you might look for the exit sign on the freeway, but you sho...

    Jeremy M. Wolfe, Abla Alaoui Soce and Hayden M. Schill

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:35

    Published on: 23 August 2017

  11. Brief report

    Integrating images from a moveable tracked display of three-dimensional data

    This paper describes a novel method for displaying data obtained by three-dimensional medical imaging, by which the position and orientation of a freely movable screen are optically tracked and used in real ti...

    Gaurav Shukla, Roberta L. Klatzky, Bing Wu, Bo Wang, John Galeotti, Brian Chapmann and George Stetten

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:34

    Published on: 23 August 2017

  12. Original article

    Can people identify original and manipulated photos of real-world scenes?

    Advances in digital technology mean that the creation of visually compelling photographic fakes is growing at an incredible speed. The prevalence of manipulated photos in our everyday lives invites an importan...

    Sophie J. Nightingale, Kimberley A. Wade and Derrick G. Watson

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:30

    Published on: 18 July 2017

  13. Original article

    The tip-of-the-tongue state and curiosity

    Theories of study time allocation and of curiosity suggest that people are most engaged with and want to devote their time to materials that are not completely mastered but also are not so difficult that they ...

    Janet Metcalfe, Bennett L. Schwartz and Paul A. Bloom

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:31

    Published on: 18 July 2017

  14. Original article

    Change deafness for real spatialized environmental scenes

    The everyday auditory environment is complex and dynamic; often, multiple sounds co-occur and compete for a listener’s cognitive resources. ‘Change deafness’, framed as the auditory analog to the well-document...

    Jeremy Gaston, Kelly Dickerson, Daniel Hipp and Peter Gerhardstein

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:29

    Published on: 28 June 2017

  15. Original article

    Magnitude, precision, and realism of depth perception in stereoscopic vision

    Our perception of depth is substantially enhanced by the fact that we have binocular vision. This provides us with more precise and accurate estimates of depth and an improved qualitative appreciation of the t...

    Paul B. Hibbard, Alice E. Haines and Rebecca L. Hornsey

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:25

    Published on: 24 May 2017

  16. Brief report

    Compensatory shifts in visual perception are associated with hallucinations in Lewy body disorders

    Visual hallucinations are a common, distressing, and disabling symptom of Lewy body and other diseases. Current models suggest that interactions in internal cognitive processes generate hallucinations. However...

    Alan Robert Bowman, Vicki Bruce, Christopher J. Colbourn and Daniel Collerton

    Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2017 2:26

    Published on: 24 May 2017

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