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Table 9 Myths and their corresponding non-narrative and narrative corrections

From: You don’t have to tell a story! A registered report testing the effectiveness of narrative versus non-narrative misinformation corrections

Item number Items Non-narrative correction Narrative correction
Myth-1 Humans are made to eat red meat; it should be part of every person’s diet Recent research-based evidence published in a leading journal shows that eating red meat on a regular basis may shorten people’s lifespans. The findings of the study suggest that meat eaters might improve their health by making simple changes. One suggestion made is to substitute one serving of red meat (like bacon or steak) a day with another type of protein. Options include fish, chicken, legumes, low-fat dairy and whole grains. The results of the study suggest that rotating in other foods in place of red meat could lower the risk of mortality by 7 to 19%
(WC = 96; FRE = 58.6; FKGL = 9.8)
“To me, there’s no finer pleasure than smelling bacon in the morning, or sinking my teeth into a perfectly cooked steak. You can imagine my panic when my daughter, who is a nurse, showed me research-based evidence that eating red meat frequently may shorten my lifespan! She asked, ‘Promise me you’ll make some changes? Just substitute one serving a day with another protein.’ With her help, I rotated in other foods like fish, chicken, legumes, low-fat dairy, and whole grains. She says that lowers my mortality risk by 7 to 19%. I still get to enjoy a sizzling steak on special occasions!”
(WC = 102; 1.06 ratio; FRE = 66.8; FKGL = 7.5)
Myth-2 Children of homosexual parents have more mental health issues A large body of research has examined the question of whether children of homosexual parents have poorer development outcomes. This research has looked at a wide range of social, emotional, health and academic outcomes. It has compared patterns of mental health and related outcomes in children with same-sex parents compared to children in more traditional households. This research shows that children or adolescents raised by same-sex parents fare equally as well as those raised by opposite-sex parents. An article published in the Journal of Marriage and Family in 2010 conducted a summary analysis of 33 individual studies on the topic. The results of the research review suggest that the strengths that are typically associated with mother–father families appear to the same degree in families with two same-sex parents
(WC = 128; FRE = 32.5; FKGL = 14)
“People sometimes ask me what it’s like to have two mothers, rather than a mom and a dad. It seems to me like my family does the same things other, ‘normal’ families do. For a college project, I actually looked into the research and found that children or adolescents raised by same-sex parents fare equally as well as those raised by opposite-sex parents on a wide range of social, emotional, health and academic outcomes. One study, published in the Journal of Marriage and Family in 2010, analyzed the results of 33 individual studies to assess how the gender of parents affected children. The authors found that the strengths typically associated with mother-father families appear to the same degree in families with two same-sex parents. I certainly don’t feel any different than my peers!”
(WC = 133; 1.04 ratio; FRE = 44.3; FKGL = 12.5)
  1. WC, Word Count; FRE, Flesch Reading Ease; FKGL, Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level