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  1. Formal mathematics is a paragon of abstractness. It thus seems natural to assume that the mathematical expert should rely more on symbolic or conceptual processes, and less on perception and action. We argue i...

    Authors: Tyler Marghetis, David Landy and Robert L. Goldstone

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:25

    Content type: Original article

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  2. A recently developed visual foraging task, involving multiple targets of different types, can provide a rich and dynamic picture of visual attention performance. We measured the foraging performance of 66 chil...

    Authors: Inga María Ólafsdóttir, Tómas Kristjánsson, Steinunn Gestsdóttir, Ómar I. Jóhannesson and Árni Kristjánsson

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:18

    Content type: Original article

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  3. This journal is dedicated to “use-inspired basic research” where a problem in the world shapes the hypotheses for a study in the laboratory. This brief review presents several examples of “use-inspired basic r...

    Authors: Jeremy M. Wolfe

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:17

    Content type: Review article

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  4. This research examined the impact of in-vehicle information system (IVIS) interactions on the driver’s cognitive workload; 257 subjects participated in a weeklong evaluation of the IVIS interaction in one of t...

    Authors: David L. Strayer, Joel M. Cooper, Jonna Turrill, James R. Coleman and Rachel J. Hopman

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:16

    Content type: Original article

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  5. Each year thousands of people are killed by looming motor vehicles. Throughout our evolutionary history looming objects have posed a threat to survival and perceptual systems have evolved unique solutions to c...

    Authors: John G. Neuhoff

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:15

    Content type: Original article

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  6. Over multiple response opportunities, recall may be inconsistent. For example, an eyewitness may report information at trial that was not reported during initial questioning—a phenomenon called reminiscence. Such...

    Authors: Sarah E. Stanley and Aaron S. Benjamin

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:14

    Content type: Original article

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  7. Many in the eyewitness identification community believe that sequential lineups are superior to simultaneous lineups because simultaneous lineups encourage inappropriate choosing due to promoting comparisons a...

    Authors: Ryan M. McAdoo and Scott D. Gronlund

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:11

    Content type: Original article

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  8. It is well reported that expert athletes have refined perceptual-cognitive skills and fixate on more informative areas during representative tasks. These perceptual-cognitive skills are also crucial to perform...

    Authors: Jochim Spitz, Koen Put, Johan Wagemans, A. Mark Williams and Werner F. Helsen

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:12

    Content type: Original article

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  9. Accurately inferring three-dimensional (3D) structure from only a cross-section through that structure is not possible. However, many observers seem to be unaware of this fact. We present evidence for a 3D amo...

    Authors: Kristin Michod Gagnier and Thomas F. Shipley

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:9

    Content type: Original article

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  10. Men’s perceptions of women’s sexual interest were studied in a sample of 250 male undergraduates, who rated 173 full-body photos of women differing in expressed cues of sexual interest, attractiveness, provoca...

    Authors: Teresa A. Treat, Hannah Hinkel, Jodi R. Smith and Richard J. Viken

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:8

    Content type: Original article

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  11. Humans often falsely report having seen a causal link between two dynamic scenes if the second scene depicts a valid logical consequence of the initial scene. As an example, a video clip shows someone kicking ...

    Authors: Alisa Brockhoff, Markus Huff, Annika Maurer and Frank Papenmeier

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:7

    Content type: ORIGINAL ARTICLE

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  12. In some circumstances, people interact with a virtual keyboard by triggering a binary switch to guide a moving cursor to target characters or items. Such switch keyboards are commonly used by patients with sev...

    Authors: Xiao Zhang, Kan Fang and Gregory Francis

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:6

    Content type: ORIGINAL ARTICLE

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  13. Whether and when humans in general, and physicians in particular, use their beliefs about base rates in Bayesian reasoning tasks is a long-standing question. Unfortunately, previous research on whether doctors...

    Authors: Benjamin Margolin Rottman, Micah T. Prochaska and Roderick Corro Deaño

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:5

    Content type: Brief report

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  14. Gestures serve many roles in communication, learning and understanding both for those who view them and those who create them. Gestures are especially effective when they bear resemblance to the thought they r...

    Authors: Seokmin Kang and Barbara Tversky

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:4

    Content type: Original article

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  15. Taking multiple-choice practice tests with competitive incorrect alternatives can enhance performance on related but different questions appearing on a later cued-recall test (Little et al., Psychol Sci 23:133...

    Authors: Erin M. Sparck, Elizabeth Ligon Bjork and Robert A. Bjork

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:3

    Content type: Original article

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  16. Novices struggle to interpret maps that show information about continuous dimensions (typically latitude and longitude) layered with information that is inherently continuous but segmented categorically. An ex...

    Authors: Kinnari Atit, Steven M. Weisberg, Nora S. Newcombe and Thomas F. Shipley

    Citation: Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications 2016 1:2

    Content type: Original article

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